Where Do TASIS Students Go To College?

Any student graduating from TASIS has earned, at a minimum, a standard US-accredited High School Diploma and can expect to gain admission to quality universities, particularly in the United States. Students who are driven to find a home at one of the world’s most selective universities can do so by pursuing an International Baccalaureate Diploma (as 57 of 92 students in the Class of 2017 did) or by taking a number of Advanced Placement courses and scoring highly on the corresponding exams. Students may further bolster their candidacy by performing well on standardized tests, writing excellent personal statements, securing strong reference letters, and exhibiting an impressive commitment to some combination of the arts, athletics, local and global service, and leadership positions on or off campus.

In short, there are many paths to success at TASIS. Below we examine the roads traveled by a number of recent graduates.

H. Miller Crist Award Winner To Study International Economics and Management at Bocconi
Posted 09/15/2017 09:00AM

Aida LoggiodiceAida Loggiodice ’17 (Venezuela) will pursue a Bachelor of Science in International Economics and Management at Bocconi University. She selected the excellent business school over University of Virginia, University of Edinburgh, University of Exeter, University of Surrey, and Tilburg University.

Aida, who is bilingual in Spanish and English and speaks some French, German, and Italian, closed out three outstanding years at TASIS by scoring an impressive 37 points on her IB Diploma assessment, delivering a remarkable speech at her class’s Senior Banquet, receiving The Cynthia Whisenant Award for Excellence in English Literature, and earning The H. Miller Crist Award, the highest recognition accorded annually by the TASIS Faculty to the senior who best embodies or pursues the ideals, aspirations, and goals of the School.

After surviving a grueling academic course load and a schedule packed with extracurricular activities—including taking on major roles in theater productions, serving as a Dorm Proctor for two years, captaining the Varsity Badminton team, being a student leader for both the Senior Humanities Program and the Understanding Ulgii (Teaching in Mongolia) Global Service Program group, choreographing and performing her own dances while also teaching ballet to Elementary School students, and drawing upon her love for art and service to start a business called Lula’s Shoes for her Capstone Project in the TASIS Leadership Academy—Aida feels well-prepared for the challenges of college.

“While in the IB Diploma Program, I learned a lot about what study methods work best for me and the dos and don'ts of effective studying,” she said. “Because I often found myself wishing there were more than 24 hours in a day, I became a big fan of checklists and waking up early in the morning. The checklists were there to help me prioritize various assignments, and waking up early—even when I didn't have to—was just a good, productive way to start the day. There's a Spanish proverb that says ‘El que madruga, Dios lo ayuda,’ meaning ‘God helps those who wake up early.’ Of course this didn't apply to weekends at all; everybody needs a break once in a while.”

Although Aida grew up wanting to follow her mother’s footsteps into the dentistry field, her plans changed as she moved through high school. “From dentistry I went to liking graphic design and then architecture before finally settling on economics,” she said. “I had an excellent economics teacher (Mr. Stephen Moon) who inspired my appreciation for the subject. As I continue my studies, I feel that Plan A is to focus on the diplomatic part of the science while Plan B is to concentrate on the marketing aspects that combine both the creative and the logical.”

Aida credits the TASIS College Counseling Office for helping her successfully navigate the college admissions process and find the right fit for her passion for economics. “It was at a college fair organized by Mr. and Mrs. Birk that I found out about Bocconi, and I am fairly sure I would not have made the choice I made had it not been for this event,” she said. “Mr. Stickley was additionally a superstar: always willing and ready to answer any questions I had for him about the fairly confusing UCAS system and even organizing a trip to the UK our junior year to get to know some of the UK universities. All in all, I leave the school very happy with the college counselors and their efforts to match me to the right universities.”

“Their unconditional love and support was always so comforting to have, and I truly believe it'd be difficult to find at any other boarding school.”

It isn’t easy for a teenager to live away from home, but Aida knew she could rely upon a number of adults at TASIS in good times and bad. She describes her art teacher, Mr. Martyn Dukes, as a second father. “I don't know if it's because art has consistently been one of my favorite classes or just because our personalities are so compatible, but I really found more than just a teacher in him,” she said. “As the art studio soon became my home away from home, it was reassuring to always have someone to turn to, especially with my parents so far away. Whatever it was, he was always willing to listen, turn it into a joke, or give me valuable advice.”

She is also grateful for everything her dorm parents did over the course of her three years at TASIS. “Their unconditional love and support was always so comforting to have, and I truly believe it'd be difficult to find at any other boarding school,” she said. “Additionally, their willingness to get to know each and every one of us personally was admirable, and even through the most difficult situations they maintained their poise and often their sense of humor too. I have made connections with these women that I hope will last a lifetime. Apart from becoming my second moms, they also become my role models.”

In turn, Aida drew inspiration from her own role as a Dorm Proctor. “Being a Proctor these past two years has changed me profoundly, and I like to think it has done so for the better,” she said. “I am just thankful for this incredible service experience. Through helping others I have been able to find myself, and before you call out my cringey cliché, allow me to explain the three stages. Before becoming a Proctor, I felt like my personality was a “flutter” one; I modified myself in order to be liked by those I was surrounded with, fitting the mold of whatever people wanted me to be. While becoming a Proctor, I realized that not only was I being dishonest with myself and everyone around me, I was also trying to be liked by everyone, which is impossible. Coming to terms with this notion was not easy, and perhaps it happened too early or too late in my life, but it is something that I believe I ultimately needed to learn. So, after becoming a Proctor, I am just crazy ol’ me. I have learned that to be respected is not to be liked: that to lead you must first follow and that you don’t have to be loud in order to be heard. I walk away from this experience knowing how to deal with lice, how to estimate how many milk cartons 50-some gorill…I’m sorry, girls might consume in a night, but most importantly: I walk away knowing how to be me.”

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